Farmer Favorites: Tools for Winter

Five field-tested finds recommended by Modern Farmer readers.

Carhartt Women’s Weathered Duck Wildwood Bib Overalls
$99.99; carhartt.com

Yeah, a hundred bucks is a lot to spend on something that will wind up covered in pig, chicken, and turkey poop. But the quilted lining makes a huge difference on cold winter mornings, and the heavy canvas fabric means I can simply hose these overalls off and hang them by the woodstove to dry.” — Alison De Paola, Plum Point, Elkton, MD

Jump Start Seedling Heat Mats
$84.95 for 48″ x 20″ size; hydrofarm.com

Since I purchased these electric mats, almost every seed I’ve started has thrived, with germination time cut in half. Because I end up with four times more seedlings than I need, I’m thinking about selling some this spring.” — Emily Turner Baebenroth, Urban Homestead, Minneapolis, MN

Bogs Women’s Classic Insulated Boots with High Handles
$130; bogsfootwear.com

I’ve found a lot of wellies to be really hot and not so waterproof. Bogs, on the other hand, actually keep the water and mud out—and my feet comfortable. My pair is still going strong after three years.” — Becky Solomon, Sweetwater Valley Farm, Glen Mills, PA

Dewalt Battery-Powered Cordless Drill
$129 (includes battery and charger); dewalt.com

I couldn’t do without this drill. In winter, I use it to stir paint that’s thick from the cold, and there’s always a screw to put in or take out.” — Jim Purdy, Birch Lane Farm, Happy Valley-Goose Bay, NL, Canada

Kubota B2320 Narrow Compact Tractor
$12,909 (base MSRP); kubotausa.com

When I bought my farm 14 years ago, I tried to mow the fields with a push mower. I mowed so much my feet bled. If not for a Kubota tractor, I’d be crippled. It’s great for mowing, tilling, and snowplowing. Horses might be more environmentally friendly, but I’ll be 70 next year.” — Richard Sales, Good Nature Farms, Qualicum Beach, BC, Canada

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Farmer Favorites: Tools for Winter