5 Last Minute Gardening Gifts

Need a stocking stuffer in a pinch?

Make your own gifts.
Photography by Daxiao Productions on Shutterstock

If you’re struggling to find something to give to your gardener relative at the last minute, here are a few easily found items or DIY gifts they might appreciate.  

Photo by Azami Adiputera on Shutterstock

Fire cider

The best gifts are often homemade. Check out our guide to making your own fire cider, a herbal elixir and cold remedy for winter months. Don’t feel obligated to use this exact recipe. Feel it out for yourself and think about the preferences of the person you’re making it for. 

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Online courses

Gift cards for an experience, such as a fancy dinner or massage, are a great last minute gift. But seeing as there isn’t much you can actually go to at the moment, online gardening courses could be a good substitute. Shades of Green is a permaculture firm based in Georgia that is launching a 13-week online course in January called “The Regenerative Backyard Blueprint,” which looks to teach new gardeners how to transform their yards using permaculture. Or you could splurge on a Masterclass subscription so your loved one can learn from Ron Finley, the Gangsta Gardener himself. 

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Jams and Jellies

Show the gardener in your life you appreciate the fruits of their labor by making them some jam. You could make hawthorn jelly (depending on where you live), quince membrillo, or even your own acorn flour. Check out our guide to canning for some help on how to preserve produce. 

Pruners

Pruning shears are available at any hardware store and are an easy gift for gardeners. We recommend Felcos, which you can find at Home Depot. You could even buy a fancy leather holster for the pruners while you’re at it.

Photo by Aquarius Studio on Shutterstock.

Unkillable plants

If you’re buying a gift for someone who likes the IDEA of gardening, but doesn’t have the time, check out this list of unkillable plants. They’re all fairly common, easy to find and they’ll thrive on neglect! 

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