7 New Books We’re Reading This Winter

From cut flowers to compact farms, winter’s best books will have you dreaming of spring.

100 Plants to Feed the Bees
Anyone with a little outdoor space can lend honeybees a hand, thanks to this guide from the Xerces Society, which details the flowers, herbs, shrubs, and trees that attract these threatened pollinators. ($17; Storey)

The Unsettlers
Author Mark Sundeen weaves together the stories of three pioneering couples—organic vegetable growers in Montana, off-the-grid Missouri homesteaders, and urban farmers in Detroit—to explore what motivates so many of us to carve out a more sustainable existence. ($26; Riverhead)

Food Fight
This comprehensive look at genetically modified organisms balances the opinions of folks on all sides of the debate. Before your eyes glaze over, rest assured: Environmental reporter McKay Jenkins delivers a nuanced overview of the controversial topic, pushing beyond the science to cover the ripple effect GMOs have had on the global food system. ($26; Avery)

Bowls of Plenty
Whole grains provide the foundation for Carolynn Carreño’s collection of more than 75 nutritious recipes. The James Beard Award–winning author layers toppings over quinoa, farro, millet, and more to create satisfying one-dish meals. ($28; Grand Central Life & Style)

Compact Farms
A huge proponent of small-scale agriculture, Oregon farmer Josh Volk outlines 15 case studies—real-life operations on five acres or less—that prove it’s possible to make a living off verylittle land. ($20; Storey)

Harvest
Bay Area landscape designers Stefani Bittner and Alethea Harampolis offer unconventional uses for nearly 50 garden plants. The duo’s recipes for marigold bitters and calamint lip balm might inspire you to add a few new seeds to your list for spring. ($22; Ten Speed Press)

Floret Farm’s Cut Flower Garden
Not just another pretty book of blooms, this practical manual by Erin Benzakein, the rock star behind Washington State’s Floret Farm, covers arranging, sure, but also how to test soil, start seeds, plan a bed, and make money. ($30; Chronicle Books)

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7 New Books We’re Reading This Winter